book review

“If you have it within your power to summon the devil. . .”

I was chosen by Netgalley to receive an advanced reader copy of “The Jekyll Revelation” by Robert Masello. Given that fact, it has not altered my opinion on the book at all. “The Jekyll Revelation” has a scheduled release date of November 8th 2016.

Who doesn’t love a good Jekyll and Hyde story? Being a 90’s kid, immediately I was reminiscent of the Pagemaster in all it’s cartoon glory. I was not expecting this book to be cartoony in the least, but between the title, and my love for a good retelling is what lead me to request a copy.

Robert Masello happens to be a new author for me. Upon looking him up, I find he’s written 16 other titles with an average rating of 3.5 stars. The other titles sound just as intriguing as this particular title, such as “The Einstein Prophecy“, “The Medusa Amulet“, and “The Romanov Cross“.

The Jekyll Revelation” starts like any typical historical fiction; in the past. It seems as though Robert Louis Stevenson, author of “Treasure Island” and “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, has unwillingly stumbled upon an incident he presumed he left back in London.

The reader switches perspectives between Stevenson, and Rafael Salazar; an environmental scientist in the state of California. Masello draws the reader in within the first chapter, and quickly leaves you wanting more as the perspectives change. At first it is unclear what role the past has on the present, but the mystery unravels itself with each turn of the page.

Stevenson, suffering from Tuberculosis, is seeking alternative treatments worldwide. His current treatment center is located in Davos, Switzerland. Stevenson hopes to not only find a cure for his ailing health, but also cure himself of his writer’s block. While in Davos, he not only receives treatment that will follow him a lifetime, but will send his writing process on a roller coaster of a ride; one he’ll never be able to leave.

Masello clearly spins his own theory about how Stevenson’s book “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” haunted his days, and nights, as well as London’s streets. Once Stevenson’s book gained popularity, it is the debut night of the play that is the start of the infamous Jack the Ripper. With Stevenson so close to the subject and the main actor of the play portraying Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to perfection, it’s no wonder both are under police scrutiny as the top suspect in the Ripper murders. Masello has the reader guessing throughout the entire book who the true monster is.

Although I enjoyed the historical aspects of “The Jekyll Revelation”, I will honestly say I did not care for the “present” story. When reading the description of this book, I thought I would be transported back to London, at the time of the Ripper murders, and stay within that period. While I typically enjoy reading between past and present, this book did not hit the mark for me.

While I am not banishing Masello from my bookshelves, I do believe I will banish “The Jekyll Revelation” from ever gracing my shelves.

2000px-2_stars.svg.png

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s